All posts tagged Sheet Metal Workers Local 24

Rick Perdue elected President of Lima Building Trades

Sheet Metal Workers Local 24 Dayton District Business Representative Rick Perdue was recently elected as the new President of the Lima Building Trades.

Perdue, who served as the Vice President, replaced Mike Knisley, who retired in the summer after the Ohio State Building and Construction Trades Council Executive Board unanimously voted him as their next Secretary-Treasurer. Knisley served in this unpaid leadership role for 11 years in addition to also being the Business Manager of UA Local 776 for 14 years.

Having served SMW 24 as a Business Representative for eight years and serving on the Lima Building Trades Executive Committee for four years, including the last two as vice president, fellow executive board members thought Perdue had the right experience, which is why he was the unanimous choice to lead the organization.

The President of the Lima Building Trades performs duties similar that those of the Secretary-Treasurer of other building trades council in Ohio.

So far, Perdue has been able to handle the extra duties. Within SMW 24, his specific territory in the Dayton District is the area north of Interstate 70, which includes the Lima Building Trades jurisdiction.

One of the first things Perdue learned about the position was the importance of scheduling and communicating with his executive board.

The Lima Building Trades hold a monthly tripartite meeting with the oil refineries in Lima, and Perdue is unable to attend some of those meetings due to conflicts with work as a SMW 24 Business Representative. Other executive board members will help Perdue to ensure every tripartite meeting is attended.

Perdue said his new role as Lima Building Trades President is not that much different than some of the responsibilities he handles for SMW 24.

He is learning about National Maintenance Agreements, including how to deal with jurisdictional and company issues. He also has been able to call Knisley for advice on some issues within the busy jurisdiction.

SMW Local 24 congratulates Perdue for his new role as President of the Lima Building and Construction Trades Council.

EPA asbestos rule change could hurt Sheet Metal Workers

Sheet Metal Workers and members of other building trades may be endangered by a new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency rule that appears to loosen the restrictions on the use of asbestos.

The proposed change would mean those seeking to use asbestos in the manufacturing of products would be required to notify the EPA at least 90 days before importing, processing or using the substance in manufacturing. The EPA would then review each request on a case-by-case basis.

According to multiple media reports, the EPA released a new proposal in June, called the “significant new use rule” (SNUR), which will allow companies to use asbestos in manufacturing of certain products or import certain products containing asbestos. Those products include adhesives, sealants, and roof and non-roof coatings; arc chutes; beater-add gaskets; extruded sealant tape and other tape; filler for acetylene cylinders; high-grade electrical paper; millboard; missile liner; pipeline wrap; reinforced plastics; roofing felt; separators in fuel cells and batteries; vinyl-asbestos floor tile; and any other building material (other than cement).

Asbestos was once widely used in the U.S in a wide variety of industries, including construction. Multiple scientific studies have identified exposure to the deadly mineral as a cause of cancer, specifically mesothelioma.

The EPA, Department of Health and Human Services, the World Health Organization and the International Agency for Research on Cancer all classify asbestos as a known carcinogen. Direct or indirect exposure can cause lung cancer, mesothelioma and other cancers, according to multiple reports and studies.

The U.S. has placed strict regulations on asbestos but has not banned the material.

Direct or indirect exposure can cause lung cancer, mesothelioma and other cancers. According to Rolling Stone Magazine, asbestos has been found to kill more than 40,000 Americans annually.

A March 2017 Center for Disease Control report said mesothelioma-related deaths have been on the rise for years. It showed more construction workers die from mesothelioma than any other industry. Insulators, pipefitters and steamfitters, plumbers, sheet metal workers, iron workers, electrical workers and welders were among the top 11 occupations who members die from mesothelioma.

If new products made with asbestos are used in construction, the number of Sheet Metal Workers and fellow building trades members with mesothelioma and other related cancers will only increase, and so will the death toll from these terrible diseases.

Sheet Metal Workers Local 24 opposes the use of asbestos in all construction products and urges the government to enact a ban on the deadly mineral.

Local 24 Members Presented 70-Year Pins

Two Sheet Metal Local 24 members were presented with their 70-year pins.

In the South Point region, Business Rep. Jeff Rowe presented a 70-year pin to Brother Vernon Martin.

This was a special event for both Rowe and Martin (pictured above).

Rowe said it was first time he has presented a member with a 70-year award. Continue reading →

Locals 24 and 33 work together to keep West Virginia HVAC Licensing Law

Sheet Metal Workers Locals 24 and 33, with help from a SMART lobbyist and the Affiliated Construction Trades (ACT) West Virginia, defeated an attempt by state legislators to repeal HVAC licensing requirements in the state.

After two years of working with legislators, SMW Locals 24, 33 and 100 won a key victory in 2015, as the state enacted a law to require state licensing for all workers who perform work on HVAC/Fire Dampers in West Virginia.

SMW Local 24 South Point Business Rep. Jeff Rowe

The licensing requirement was ultimately put in place to keep fly by night contractors and out-of-state contractors from coming into West Virginia and hiring whomever they wanted, not knowing whether or not the workers are skilled.

The legislation helped our Locals secure market share and also stemmed the tide of out of state contractors and fly-by-night contractors who would undermine local standards.

A year later, Republicans gained control of the Statehouse and repealed Prevailing Wage and introduced So-Called “Right to Work” legislation.

Over the next two years, they put bills forward to repeal the HVAC licensing, but the bills died in committee as pro-labor Republicans joined Democrats in killing these bills in committee.

Early this year, House and Senate leaders made repealing the HVAC license a high priority.

Partnership Development Representative and SMART lobbyist Steve Hancock worked with SMW Local 24 Business Rep. Jeff Rowe and Steve White, Director of ACT West Virginia, to lobby against the repeal of the license and educate legislators about its importance.

Through hard work and with support from SMW Local 33, the SMART coalition was able to convince members of the GOP that repealing the HVAC license was a bad idea. Facing mounting pressure, Republican leaders vowed to not introduce legislation to repeal the HVAC license as long as licensing requirements were lowered for residential technicians.

Rowe said the education and lobbying helped create enough allies were the Republicans did not have the votes for a full repeal and they settled to only tweak the residential requirements.

“It is very important that we stick together and educate legislators as much as possible and stay as strong as we can,” said Rowe. “It’s very important to build allies because under this current legislative map we are the outsiders.”

SMW Local 24 thanks the hard work and activism of SMART members and Local 33 – along with the solidarity shown from other trades and Local 24 members for helping us save this important license.

Second-Year Apprentices Complete COMET Training

Second-year Sheet Metal Workers Local 24 apprentices recently completed COMET training to help them better understand the role organizing plays in helping grow our union.

Construction Organizing Membership Education Training (COMET) was created in the mid-90s by what was then known as the Building and Construction Trades Department (BCTD), now called North America’s Building Trades Unions (NABTU). The BCTD noticed an alarming trend as the number of building trades unions and affiliated members were both in rapid decline. Continue reading →

Cincinnati leaders attempting to stall Responsible Bidder ordinance implementation

Following an early January Ohio Appeals Court ruling that cleared the way for Cincinnati to enforce its disputed Responsible Bidder ordinance, the city administration is now attempting to stall its implementation.

The ordinance requires contractors on certain public construction projects to have graduated at least one employee from a registered apprenticeship program every year for the last five years. This ordinance is to be implemented in conjunction with a local hire program as well. The Responsible Bidder ordinance essentially requires contractors to supply a union workforce for Metropolitan Sewer District (MSD) projects over $400,000. Contracts under $400,000 are exempt from the ordinance in order to allow smaller businesses to bid on these projects.

By creating the ordinance, the city understood that a registered apprenticeship program produces a construction worker who, regardless of race or gender, works efficiently and can help save time and money on the jobsite. Continue reading →

Appeals Court overturns ruling; Paves way for Cincinnati Responsible Bidder Ordinance

A court ruling has cleared the way for the city of Cincinnati to enforce its Responsible Bidder ordinance.

In early January, the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals reversed the ruling of a lower court, paving the way for the city to require contractors to have graduated at least one employee from a registered apprenticeship program every year for the last five years.

Allied Construction Industries, a not-for-profit construction trades group for non-union contractors, sued the city, saying the ordinance was a way to ensure only union signatory contractors could successfully bid on contracts. Continue reading →

Cincinnati Training Coordinator Gary Shinkle Retires

Gary Shinkle, who spent the last 18 years as Cincinnati Training Coordinator, has officially retired.

Following a staff meeting and lunch on Nov. 1, Business Manager Rodney French, with help from the Local 24 staff, presented Brother Shinkle with a proclamation from Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley. Continue reading →

City of Columbus Signs Historic Community Benefits Agreement with Building Trades

The City of Columbus and the Columbus/Central Ohio Building and Construction Trades Council signed a historic Community Benefits Agreement (CBA) to  partner together to ensure the work to construct Columbus Fire Station No. 35 is performed by the area’s building trades.

The CBA also requires the C/COBCTC to host apprenticeship-recruitment fairs and to contribute 5 cents per hour worked on the project, to be deposited into a scholarship fund for apprenticeship programs.

“This agreement includes many firsts for our city, all built on my commitment to expanding Columbus’ success to every person in every neighborhood,” said Columbus Mayor Andrew Ginther. “This agreement offers the City and its residents many benefits.”

Continue reading →

 Members and Contractors donate supplies to Hurricane Irma Relief Efforts

Hurricane Irma left its mark in mid-September, leaving a trail of death and destruction through Florida and parts of the southeast.

On the morning of Sept. 10, Irma hit the Florida Keys about 20 miles north of Key West as a category 4 Hurricane with sustained winds of 130 mph.

Several hours later, Irma came ashore on the mainland over Naples, as it made its way north through Florida.

The hurricane ravaged the Sunshine state, leaving cities under water, and according to multiple media reports, 60 percent of homes across Florida were left without power. Continue reading →

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