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Appeals Court overturns ruling; Paves way for Cincinnati Responsible Bidder Ordinance

A court ruling has cleared the way for the city of Cincinnati to enforce its Responsible Bidder ordinance.

In early January, the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals reversed the ruling of a lower court, paving the way for the city to require contractors to have graduated at least one employee from a registered apprenticeship program every year for the last five years.

Allied Construction Industries, a not-for-profit construction trades group for non-union contractors, sued the city, saying the ordinance was a way to ensure only union signatory contractors could successfully bid on contracts. Continue reading →

Bill will Aid High School Apprenticeship Recruitment

Sheet Metal Workers Local 24 stands to benefit from a bill recently passed in the Ohio House.

House members voted unanimously to approve House Bill 98, the Ohio High School Career Opportunity Act, which gives equal opportunity for representatives from colleges and universities, the armed forces, skilled trades, businesses and charitable organizations to present information on future career and post-graduate opportunities to high school students.

HB 98 now moves to the Senate for possible committee hearings and floor vote. If passed by the Senate, it will become law and give the building trades more access to public schools to expose students to careers in the building trades. Continue reading →

Appeals Court Rules in Favor of Residency Requirements on Public Projects

Posted by / December 18, 2017 / Categories: News / Tags: , , , , , , / 0 Comments

Ohio’s 8th District Court of Appeals ruled House Bill 180, which banned residency requirements on public construction projects, as unconstitutional.

The ruling upheld a Cleveland residency law that requires contractors who successfully bid on certain public construction projects within the city, to guarantee 20 percent of the hours worked must be performed by Cleveland residents, and 4 percent of that 20 percent must be allocated for low-income Cleveland residents.

By striking down H.B. 180, the court has granted chartered municipalities the right to enforce hiring requirements on certain publicly-funded construction projects. This means cities such as Columbus, Dayton and Cincinnati can require contractors hire a designated percentage of their residents to work on certain construction projects. Continue reading →